Adelaide Study Tour - Day Four. Penfolds Magill Estate and Borsa



It was the perfect way to spend the last day of our study tour, being wowed by lunch at Penfolds Magill Estate, one of Australia's oldest and most iconic wineries, with a story that dates all the way back to 1844.


Upon arrival we were treated to a lesson in the history of the estate, including how founders Dr Christopher and Mary Penfold planted vine cuttings they had carried aboard vessel the Taglioni on their voyage over to Australia. In 1844 the fledging vineyard was officially established as the Penfolds wine company at Magill Estate.


The story of the company's first chief Winemaker Max Schubert, appointed in 1948, was also very interesting as we learned how in 1959 despite being instructed to stop making his famous Grange, he continued to perfect his wine experiment in secret, and the tradition of ‘bin wines’ began.


In 1960, the Penfolds board instructed Max Schubert to officially re-start production on Grange, his determination and the quality of the aged wine had won them over, and soon, the medals began flowing and Grange quickly became one of the most revered wines around the world. In 1988 Schubert was named Decanter Magazine’s Man of the Year, and on the 50th anniversary of its birth, Penfolds Grange was given a heritage listing in South Australia.


Speaking of Grange, we were informed there was a bottle at the vineyard valued at $20,000 but despite some discussion, there were no takers from our tour.


Then we were treated to what might have been the most spectacular event of the tour, a private lunch in the cellar.


When the double doors opened for the big reveal, it was breathtaking to say the least and the cuisine and wine that followed was incredible.



When the double doors opened for the big reveal, it was breathtaking to say the least and the cuisine and wine that followed was incredible...


We enjoyed an incredible degustation menu of Magill Estate sourdough and house churned butter to start, followed by kingfish with watermelon radish and lime matched with 2017 Bin 311 Chardonnay, Multi Regional.


Second course was scotch fillet with Japanese mustard and potato matched with 2015 St Henri Shiraz, South Australia.


Third course and dessert, was chocolate and candied hazelnuts with honeycomb matched with Grandfather Tawny.


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Our last evening dinner was at Borsa Pasta Cucina, an Italian restaurant tucked away in the ground floor of the Grenfell Centre , also known as the 'black stump', in one of Adelaide's eclectic and art-filled alleyways.


Named after the Italian stock exchange, Borsa is a traditional Italian bistro that serves incredible authentic Italian cuisine from fresh pasta airing in the kitchen, to veal scallopini and cotoletta alla milanese - a crumbed pork loin.


For our 'last supper', we were treated to an antipasto starter plate of marinated olives, prosciutto san daniele, salumino picante, vendure sottolio, provolone picante, whitebait pickled and served with house-baked bread.



Named after the Italian stock exchange, Borsa is a traditional Italian bistro that serves incredible authentic Italian cuisine from fresh pasta airing in the kitchen, to veal scallopini and cotoletta alla milanese - a crumbed pork loin...


The next course, a pasta share plate, boasted gnocchi con pomodoro: tomato, garlic and basil, tagliatelli con salsicce: home made pork sausage, basil and chilli, angnolotti con zucc e ricotta: pumpkin and ricotta parcels with pine nuts and sage butter, and linguine tutto mare: prawns, crab meat, calamari, mussels and cockles.


If that wasn't enough, then came the meat course with veal scaloppine alla saltimocca: veal and prosciutto with rosemary fried potatoes, and cotoletta alla milanese: crumbed veal pork loin with lemon olive oil salad.


We finished with a dessert of hazlenut cream filled profitorole, and pistacchio gelato with fig and ricotta canoli.


Throughout dinner there was a great deal of chat and planning for our final hurrah out on the town, but by the end of the night most of us were so full and tired we retreated back to the InterContinental to sleep off our food comas!


WHAT WE LEARNED FROM DAY FOUR


  • Penfolds Magill Estate is both magical and breath-taking

  • No one was keen to spend $20,000 on a bottle of Grange - not that day anyway

  • Rolly was by far the best-dressed passenger on our bus

  • Penfolds Magill is one of the oldest wineries in Australia

  • The company's first chief Winemaker Max Schubert was a rebel and thank goodness because Grange may have all but disappeared had he not continued working on it in secret

  • Reading the menu is very important - and taking note that at Borsa the pasta course is NOT the end of the meal, can be the difference between breathing out or not, by the end of the night

  • Food coma is a real thing

  • After four days of eating, drinking, learning and having fun - most of us had to go to bed after dinner!

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